Est. 1995

Tag: Americans of Conscience

Good News

https://americansofconscience.com/

https://americansofconscience.com/

 

Work for justice, but pause to celebrate
We are aware that atrocious, inhumane events are happening both at home and abroad. Because of this, though celebration may seem superficial, it is crucial to recognize that our efforts are leading to the change we seek. While we work for justice, let us also pause to acknowledge the considerable good that pervades our goals and communities.

 

Celebrate good news

Support the good news list

Some very special people help make our lists of good news and positive actions possible. Thank you, patrons! Join them to get the good news a week early! Learn more here.

Gratefully,
— Jen Hofmann and the AoCC team

Good news

https://americansofconscience.com/

https://americansofconscience.com/

 

Here at CounterPoint, we sort through the 24/7 fire hose of news to try to bring attention to under-heard voices of reason. We’ll continue to do that, but it’s just as important to celebrate good news whenever we can. We’re so grateful to activist Jennifer Hofmann and her Americans of Conscience volunteers for their dedication to turning bad news into positive action.

 

https://americansofconscience.com/

 

Here’s a recent sample:

Go, Iris Mogul!

Iris Mogul, a high school student who started a banned books club, is photographed with one of her favorite books during the “Walk for Freadom” kickoff event on Sunday, October 1, 2023 in Coral Gables, Florida. The march began at the Coral Gables Congregational United Church of Christ and ended at Books & Books. Carl Juste cjuste@miamiherald.comRead more at: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/miami-dade/coral-gables/article279931759.html#storylink=cpy

Iris Mogul, a high school student who started a banned books club, is photographed with one of her favorite books during the “Walk for Freadom” kickoff event on Sunday, October 1, 2023, in Coral Gables, Florida. The march began at the Coral Gables Congregational United Church of Christ and ended at Books & Books. Carl Juste cjuste@miamiherald.com

 

Since she was little, Iris Mogul has always loved reading.

When The 16-year-old junior at the Academy Academy for Advanced Academics in South Florida learned that her English teacher was considering not teaching a Toni Morrison book because of the state’s political environment, she decided to start a banned book club.

There were 300 books removed from Florida schools last year, according to a list released by the Florida Department of Education. Nationally, the American Library Association found that the number of books facing challenges for censorship is up 20 percent for the first eight months of this year compared to 2022. That includes more than 800 books in school districts across 37 states.

“It was kind of like a double whammy because it’s like an act of resistance… and it’s a way to start a book club and talk to people,” said Mogul, a student in a dual enrollment program at Florida International University. As part of Florida’s expanded “Parental Rights in Education” law, one parent or community member can object to instructional material or a school library book. The law, signed in May, requires the book or materials to be removed within five days of the objection and remain unavailable to students until the issue is resolved. More books were pulled from shelves in Florida public schools than in any other state last school year.

With everything that’s going on in the world right now, we really appreciate being able to share a bit of positive news…

Democracy in Distress: Unpacking America’s 5 Top Threats 

Threat 1: Cynicism and Apathy

Opposite sides of the same coin, cynicism and apathy are the reasons many Americans are not taking action right now. In a democracy, if we don’t use it, we lose it. The challenge is getting people to care enough to speak up and be part of the solutions. In the first of five articles, learn the single, most effective way to overcome cynicism and apathy—others and your own.

Threat 2: Misinformation

Have you noticed how friends and family are resistant to correct information? The current state of siloed news in the U.S. is profoundly toxic to our democracy. Yet there are ways to share accurate information that cuts through resistance. Learn all about what works in week two.

Threat 3: Hate

Abuse aimed at people of different races, economic statuses, genders, religions, etc. is an abject failure of our society. While hate might seem intractable, it isn’t. In the third week, we’ll introduce you to straightforward solutions that stop hatred at its root, creating a kinder, more equitable nation.

Threat 4: Uncivil discourse

Collaboration is the key ingredient that makes democracy work. Disrespect and disdain kill it. We cannot tolerate extreme views, but most Americans have positive overlaps in their political Venn diagrams; The trick is learning to find them. In week four, learn techniques that restore trust, civility, and collaboration—in our neighborhoods to Congress.

Threat 5: News and social media

The myriad outlets that keep us informed can also cause apathy, cynicism, and overwhelm. Corporate advertising plays to our fears by design, decreasing the quality and depth of information we need to understand important issues. In the final week, discover new strategies that keep you in control as a consumer of news media and informed as an engaged citizen.

What’s next

As we gear up for the next presidential primaries and election, there’s no time like the present to take an active part in your nation’s future. Addressing these threats strategically with thoughtful, doable steps can create the welcoming country we know is possible. In the coming weeks, look for clear ways to speak up and show up for ourselves, each other, and future generations:
 

Don’t let headlines demoralize you. 

 

Americans of Conscience

You’re not alone in your hopes for a better nation. While there’s always work to do, it’s vital to pause from time to time, recognize signs of progress, and celebrate successes together.

Intentional celebration builds resiliency. So, we offer you this week’s list of wins for democracy, equity, and checks on those who want to take our nation backward. Thanks for being part of something hopeful!

Want to be part of the solution?

Open our most recent Americans of Conscience Checklist, take action, and let your voice be heard!

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