Est. 1995

Tag: Mifepristone

Texas is trying out new tactics to restrict access to abortion pills online.

Online abortion resources can pose risks to privacy. But there are lots of ways to access them more safely. Here are some resources we recommend.

There’s been a quiet shift in the abortion fight in the US. Since the reversal of Roe v. Wade last June, laws that make most abortions illegal have passed in 13 states. Efforts to restrict abortion care have, so far, focused mostly on criminalizing medical providers. But increasingly, the battleground is moving online.

Texas is currently in the process of trying to limit access to abortion pills by cracking down on internet service providers and credit card processing companies. Earlier this month, Republicans in the state legislature introduced two bills to that effect.

These tactics reflect the reality that, post-Roe, the internet is a critical channel for people seeking information about abortion or trying to buy pills to terminate a pregnancy—especially in states where they can no longer access these things in physical pharmacies or medical centers.

Texas is trying out new tactics to restrict access to abortion pills online

Skip to Content Proposed laws would punish ISPs, online publishers, and credit card companies for providing information about or direct access to pills. This article is from The Technocrat, MIT Technology Review’s weekly tech policy newsletter about power, politics, and Silicon Valley. To receive it in your inbox every Friday, sign up here .

UPDATE: Walgreens’ deceptive damage control

Walgreens is facing a public relations crisis after announcing it would not dispense abortion medication in several states where abortion remains legal. Walgreens’ decision came in response to threatening letters from Republican Attorneys General and anti-abortion activists. The decision has provoked outrage from many customers who object to a major corporation placing additional restrictions on abortion access.

Walgreens attempted to stem the damage with a tweet purporting to “make very clear what our position always has been” on Mifepristone, a drug used in combination with Misoprostol to induce abortion. The company says it will “dispense Mifepristone in any jurisdiction where it is legally permissible.”

Walgreens’ statement, however, does not clarify in which states it will dispense Mifepristone. And that is the question central to the entire controversy.

UPDATE: Walgreens’ deceptive damage control

Walgreens is facing a public relations crisis after announcing it would not dispense abortion medication in several states where abortion remains legal. Walgreens’ decision came in response to threatening letters from Republican Attorneys General and anti-abortion activists. The decisionhas provoked outrage from many customers who object to a major corporation placing additional restrictions on abortion access.

© 2024 CounterPoint